Future Privacy

Future Privacy

What is wrong with giving up a little privacy, for something that makes things easier, saves money or makes me feel safer? I think people have different opinions on this.

This Future For All video is a parody about the future of privacy. How much private information are you willing to give up for savings or convenience?


Here are some other technologies that bug my privates:

-Internet sites that gather and share my personal information and internet activity.

-Search engines that show ads for products I searched for yesterday. That's creepy!

-Free email services that use artificial intelligence to scan my email and show relevent ads to the side.

-GPS devices. This abused technology will be used more often, and in more places, as gps tracking devices shrink in size and cost.

-Genetic profiling, aka genetic fingerprinting, is a DNA testing method used to find out if you are more likely to have certain types of diseases in your lifetime. There are concerns that insurance providers and employers could use this information to discriminate.

-Nano-sized microphones and flying insect cameras are in the visible future. What will privacy be like when nowhere is private?

-Invisibility cloaks are for real and they will only get better. What will they be hiding?

-Being monitored in public places of business to discover my shopping habits.

-Facial recognition cameras.

-Traffic cameras.


Yes, we are tracking you, but look at all the cool stuff you get!

Most technologies listed above have a good reason to be used, or it would simply be called spying.

-Internet sites store cookies and other tracking code to help remember you when you revisit a web site to make navigation easier.

-Search engines show ads for things I am interested in (unless my girlfriend searched for purses on my computer).

-Free email services aren't really free. What was I thinking.

-GPS devices. Help me find my car in a big parking lot.

-Genetic profiling, could help find cures to diseases.

-Invisibility cloaks could help shield things from radiation.

-Being monitored in public places of business to improve your shopping experience.

-Facial recognition cameras can help spot bad guys.

-Traffic cameras (only upset me when I get caught).


What can you do to keep your privacy?

Good luck with that. The entities that want our data have got us by the bytes--with lengthy Terms of Conditions, conveniences that become necessary or savings offers, in exchange for your personal information.

For myself, the benefits often outweigh the exposure. I tried all the steps necessary to keep my internet activity private, but it was a hassle, and you must do it every time you use the browser. What do I have to hide anyway? Do I care that marketing companies know what I searched for? Not enough to swim against the tide.

If you are concerned about protecting your privacy, articles and web resources can be found below.


robotic insect spies

Flying Friends or Privacy Pests?

Robotic insects are jumping at the chance to assist humans in search and rescue. Robot insects could also be used for spying. Robotic insect spies


This image is not an actual lie detection scan

Brain Frees

Powerful lie detection tools may someday surpass the accuracy of the polygraph and permanently change how suspects are convicted -- and freed.

Lie Detection


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About Jack Hanson

Jack Hanson

Jack is not your typical future technology blogger. As an early baby boomer, he's lost a bit of his bang. Not intending to be cruel, Facebook recently notified him that his schoolmates at General Equivalency Diploma, really want to be friends again. His yearly income averages just above his monthly urges. In spite of that, or because of it, Jack has a lust for living, a thirst for knowledge and a strong desire to contribute to a better future for all.


A nerdy social misfit with a head full of phobias and a quirky sense of humor, his personality has been described as "Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory--without the genious part."


Jack Hanson is solely responsible for the articles, editing and web design of FutureForAll.org.

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